GETTING AROUND

Mexico 2019 | TRANSPORT | INTERVIEW

The economy needs to keep people moving across an increasingly complex transport infrastructure. MOBILITY ADO has solutions to help.

Aldo Alarcón
BIOGRAPHY
Aldo Alarcón holds a degree in business administration from the Tecnológico de Monterrey. In 1992, he joined Grupo ADO, now known as MOBILITY ADO. At MOBILITY ADO, he has held various positions, including Commercial Manager of Línea Vía, General Manager of Línea Vía, General Manager of the Villahermosa Region, General Manager of the Puebla Region, and Director of Divisional Oriente. He currently serves as Director General of Transport at MOBILITY ADO.

What steps did the company take to realize it could go from being a bus company to an intelligent mobility solutions company?

A few years ago, we realized that although we were doing a good job in transporting people from one city to another, we could do more. Around five years ago, we acquired a company in Spain and figured that mobility is much more integrated than just from one city to another. We therefore decided to evolve from a regular bus company into a mobility group. We want to improve the lives of people in cities. At MOBILITY ADO, we believe that every client's mobility needs start right before they plan to go on a trip, in terms of how the ticket is purchased and the best mode of transportation, no matter the purpose of the trip. People in cities with excellent mobility systems have a higher quality of life and are thus much happier. Our mission is to make the experience of customers better in order to improve their lives. This means the way passengers get to the terminal, the trip itself, and how they connect to the urban systems have to be more integrated.

What do cities in Mexico need to do to avoid congestion?

We have to start viewing cities as systems and invest in public transport; cities that invest in infrastructure for cars are becoming less mobile. Mexico City has had some success in the BRT and metro systems but there is a need to integrate them further. We are trying in Querétaro to take over the urban system, and this will be a huge challenge for us. We have to transform it into an integrated system to improve the quality of life. Several Mexican cities have political issues regarding transport, but the stakeholders fail to prioritize people's mobility needs.

What does your mobility project in Querétaro consist of?

We are developing eight routes that will go through the city. In some areas, there will be buses and cars but the difference is that it is an integrated system with one ticket to pay for all the different modes of transport. The project is huge and quite a challenge with 150 people from MOBILITY ADO working there. The governor of Querétaro fully understands what is needed to transform it into a city with an improved mobility system. This is why he chose to partner with us, which is the first such partnership in Mexico. We expect to receive 250 buses in August, and that will make a difference. We already have the payment method and are trying to integrate it to inform and educate the city about its uses and features. We are trying to build a strong base to start seeing results in 2019.

What other countries or regions are you targeting?

We are expanding our operations in Central America, with a particular interest in Guatemala and Costa Rica. We are trying to make international routes from Tapachula in Mexico all the way through to Panama, which is set to be completed by the end of the year. In Guatemala, we have been present for nine years, and in 2019 we decided to cover the entire of Central America. We are looking at opportunities in India, South America, Ghana, and Australia, so we are proud to be considered as an option in countries across the world.