HEAVY LIFTING

Mexico 2013 | REAL ESTATE & CONSTRUCTION | INTERVIEW

TBY talks to Rolando Ugalde Mercado, General Director of Cargo Crane Mexico, on ensuring the right quality, human capital, and strategies for success in the real estate sector.

Rolando Ugalde Mercado
BIOGRAPHY
Ronaldo Ugalde Mercado is a Civil Engineer with 12 years of experience at Cargo Crane Mexico. Prior to his current position as General Director of the company, he worked at Subsoil Mexico as Founder and General Director during 2005-2010. He also founded Farenholz Mexico, where he worked from 1998-2000. He studied at Anahuac University.

What has been your strategy for success?

Our main priority is to do a variety of small projects with an impeccable degree of perfection. We are not a very big company, but we put an immense amount of effort into all that we do. In our latest initiative, the Arco Sur project for ICA, we are bringing in cranes from Liebherr that are capable of carrying 1,200 tons. We have added an additional three cranes of 1,200 tons, two 500-ton cranes, and one 700-ton crane. The company is improving its operations, because we have to supply five or six beams per night over a time span of five hours. It is vital that no crane fails at any moment. We are the only company in Mexico that has invested in the latest models. We have been accident free since the beginning because our people are very well trained, and we have been patient to carry out projects the right way every time.

What is the strategy behind Cargo Crane Mexico's new company structure?

Currently, we are aware of the fact that sectors and divisions of businesses are changing throughout the world. We saw that the development of solar energy had been delayed, and Mexico doesn't fully understand the concept of green energy. We went to Germany, where we have built a relationship with a leading solar energy company called Sen. It provides engineering and knowledge for the building of solar power plants and buildings for a public purpose. Our intention is to break into the necessary sectors in Mexico, especially industry and real estate, where changes are being made in electricity and thermal energy. We want to sell the quality associated with German products, and we have projects with Corona, Coca-Cola, and ICA in a variety of plants and structures that are leaning toward green energy solutions. Progress is fairly slow, but we are motivating companies to changes their use of energy.

What trends have you seen in demand for your services?

The trends are positive. Foreign companies appreciate serious companies, and as a Mexican group we are very serious. We want to do everything right, and we are never out to deceive people; we do business with good people, and foreign companies realize that. They would like to work with us, and we are looking forward to joining forces also. In the end, we are selling trust and confidence, and we have a very good opportunity to succeed with this approach in the coming years.

“We want to do everything right, and we are never out to deceive people."

With more money being injected into the country, what would you say are some of the challenges Mexico faces as it strives to achieve its full potential?

I believe that Mexico is very difficult to understand at times. Every six years, the country changes drastically with the new government. However, I believe that the next six years will bring about change like never before, and it will be for the best. President Calderón has done an excellent job in regard to the economy, and I expect President Peña Nieto to contribute to that trend and take advantage of this work. Worldwide, Mexico has a very good growth position, and the new Secretary of Infrastructure has very good knowledge about building the country. There is a lot of work ahead, but the point is to choose quality. We can all agree that the focus has to be on the right infrastructure with great quality.

What are your expansion plans in the coming year?

Our intention is to expand our workforce of good people, because it is our main problem. It is not easy to find the right people for our team. In the crane division we have a number of talented individuals, and I believe we are prepared and in very good shape. We are poised to be the perfect company in that line of business. However, in our other divisions we need to invest in good people. We have to bring in people from Spain, Germany, and other parts of Europe to build the good mentality we are seeking. We have the opportunity to train good people, but at the level of directors, it is very complicated to find the right talent. There are few who are willing to take that level of responsibility, and many who outright avoid it—we want to invest in good engineers who can be leaders.