GOLF IN MALLORCA

SPORTS & TOURISM | FOCUS

Good news has arrived in Mallorca with the announcement of the Mallorca Golf Open, to be held this year from October 21-24 with a prize purse of EUR1 million. The Mallorca Golf Open will be played at Golf Santa Ponsa I and will be the last tournament of the Spanish leg of the European Tour.


The hosting of the event has been made possible thanks to the action of e|motion group, a sports events company, whose CEO, Edwin Weindorfer, declared: "We are very proud that, after the ATP Mallorca Championships, we have managed to bring another top sporting event to Santa Ponça with the Mallorca Golf Open.

This has only been possible thanks to great collaboration with the European Tour and the support of the local authorities, including the Regional Government of the Balearic Islands, the Government of Mallorca, and the City Hall of Calvià, as well as the Balearic Federation of Golf, the Royal Spanish Golf Federation, and Golf Santa Ponça. With this tournament, one of the island's most attractive golf destinations is once again at the center of world sporting interest".

But how does golf fit into an island economy traditionally known for its sun and sand tourist offering? Mallorca boasts a total of 21 golf courses within a one-hour distance, which makes for a convenient destination for golfers. And indeed, many players can reach the island in under two hours from many European locations.

The island's economy, highly dependent on tourism, has experienced a massive blow due to COVID-19 and the subsequent travel restrictions. Nevertheless, the pandemic has pushed local authorities and businesspeople to hit the reset button and think how the economy can be sustained in the long run while also making it more resilient.

Golf comes into play here.

First, the golf season runs from March to November, encompassing months around summer that are somewhat of an off-season for the traditional tourism industry Golf fans coming to Mallorca during these months serve as a driver for an extended summer for hotels and tourism-dependent businesses. Additionally, according to figures by the Spanish Association of Golf Courses, of every EUR8 a golf tourist spends on the island, only EUR1 goes to gold, suggesting a hefty spillover effect into the rest of the economy.

The island's leadership, however, is also concerned about sustainability, and is working to set a higher standard in terms of sustainability and thus continue to attract environment-minded golf fans. Indeed, Bernadino Jaume Mulet, President of the Balearic Federation of Golf, recently told The Business Year that; “Our courses in Mallorca are irrigated with purified water. We are a solution in terms of water-related problems. The purified water used to irrigate the courses is filtered again into the soil, and the water cycle never stops.

We only use 6% of all the water that is purified in the Balearic Islands. Investments are also being made to robotize the irrigation system, which helps to control the irrigation in the event of a dry or rainy day. There are also some courses in the Balearic Islands that use a type of grass that consumes 30% less water.

Golf courses on the Balearic Islands have had to invest heavily in developing water treatment systems or infrastructures to bring that purified water into the courses. There are also some courses with solar panels to become more sustainable. Furthermore, there are birds flocking into Mallorca due to the biodiversity brought about by the golf courses.”

In all, as golf becomes increasingly important for the long-term strategy of growth in Mallorca, the new Mallorca Golf Open will be a cherry on the cake for 2022. Golfers will flock to the island, later returning home to tell their peers how the grass was greener in Mallorca.