David Ducognon

General Manager, Total Jamaica

Total is a major player in the Caribbean. We are present in the French islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe, Haiti, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Jamaica, where we have been present for over 13 years now. We started by acquiring a local company called National Fuels and Lubricants. Four years later, in 2008, we bought the Esso assets. We are present in different distribution sectors. With a network of close to 60 service stations, Total has the largest number of service stations in Jamaica. We also have assets at the fuel depot Jamaica Petroleum Terminal in Montego Bay. We are in the aviation business at both airports and supply lubricants and special fluids. Total supplies fuel mainly from Petrojam, the local refinery, but also imports fuel directly from the Caribbean Community (CARICOM). We also have a general trade business in Jamaica, which involves B2B activities, where we supply fuel products and lubricants to various businesses in Jamaica, including mining, transport, agriculture and tourism.


Wes Edens

Founder & Chairman , New Fortress Energy

Our company, New Fortress Energy, came to Jamaica three years ago. The utility company JPS had started an initiative to bring gas to convert its power plant in Montego Bay. In December 2014, we competed for that mandate because we were interested in being a part of the energy infrastructure business in Jamaica. We were fortunate enough to be successful in the summer of 2015. From there, we built the terminal in Montego Bay that became operational and commissioned the 120MW Bogue gas-power plant 13 months later. From this first investment and partnership with JPS, a whole series of transactions has developed. We are also partners with JPS in providing gas for the 190MW plant it is building in Old Harbour. Jamalco is an interesting case because it is an industrial partner that needs power as well as steam for their industrial processes. Given how important mining is to Jamaica, we want to be in situations where we can make a difference.


Mervyn Eyre

CEO, Fujitsu Caribbean,, Central America and Mexico

Fujitsu operates as a regional business in the Caribbean, with Jamaica being a primary location. As such, it is a part of our regional business and incorporated into our global business. The IT industry is undergoing a deep transformation as it deals with the reality of the fourth industrial revolution and the impact of digital. Fujitsu believes there are tremendous opportunities and how we leverage this differentiates us in the Jamaican market, allowing us to be locally responsive and at the same time drive scale and innovation. Fujitsu has been in Jamaica and the Caribbean for 70 years. Before Fujitsu acquired us, we were a European company called ICL. Fujitsu has profoundly changed the region and pioneered several advances in ICT, by selling its products from mainframes to complete digital technologies, but also by developing local capabilities and capacities. Fujitsu has influenced most IT practitioners across the region and in Jamaica.


Eva Lewis

Citi Country Officer/Corporate and Investment Bank Head, Citi Jamaica

Citi opened its doors in Jamaica 57 years ago under the name First National City Bank. Until the early 1980s, we operated 11 full service branches before making a strategic decision to focus our business on a select group of corporate clients and effectively exit the retail banking space to become a single branch dedicated to managing relationships with a select market target of corporate clients. This remains our core focus to date. Our product offering spans corporate and investment banking, which includes structured loans, mergers and acquisition advisory, international and local bond issuances, and treasury products ranging from foreign exchange to complex exposure management derivative solutions. We also offer trade finance and cash management services. Our clients include the financial industry in which we play a unique role as a US bank with a local presence. We offer correspondent banking services to many of the local banks and non-bank financial institutions, a service that has recently seen significant challenges in the region.


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