Felipe Sandoval

General Manager for Mexico Operations, Zodiac Aerospace

The company made a location analysis. Today, the aerospace industry has two major markets—Europe and North America—with a third one growing quickly in Asia. There are important players in North America that are a tier below the major company, Boeing. This middle segment is rich, making the entire region important for us. The industrial growth of the Mexican automotive industry developed the technical infrastructure required to give birth to a homegrown aerospace industry in Mexico. The aerospace industry really started to develop around 12 years ago, and a lot of companies entered the market. This development has seen an even bigger jump over the last eight years.


Luis G. Lizcano

Director General, Mexican Federation of Aerospace Industries (FEMIA)

We have many competitive advantages for this industry in Mexico; the first is the availability of human talent in terms of specialized technicians and engineers. This industry has its own features and characteristics that significantly depend on skilled people and the right talent to be developed for the industry. It is also the best cost platform for the US and Mexico has become part of the equation in the America's aerospace market. We have not fully developed a supply chain yet, though Mexico's potential to develop a consistent, efficient, and cost competitive supply chain is another main competitive advantage. Currently, most of the R&D of the industry is being done outside Mexico; however, efforts are being made in this respect. For example, the establishment of National Center of Aeronautics Technologies (CENTA) in 2018 will start generating the right R&D for Mexican operations and aerospace industry.


Daniel Parfait

General Director of Mexico and Central America, Safran

We need to develop, for our interests and the interests of the country, the supply chain in Mexico. We work with the Mexican Federation of Aerospace Industries (FEMIA) on this issue, and there is a new commission within FEMIA to achieve concrete results. We are thus expending a great deal of energy on this topic. The first challenge is education. When we open a plant, it means we need to prepare workers for the fabrication of the most sophisticated parts. We prepare them a year in advance, sending them to France or other countries just to get prepared; it is a long process. To further develop this, we have the French-Mexican aeronautics campus in Querétaro.


Jorge GutiÉrrez Velasco R.

Rector, Universidad Aeronáutica en Querétaro (UNAQ)

The relationship between the public and private sectors has been strong; we are the result of setting up public competencies for developing the human personnel for companies and need to work closely with the private sector. This gives us the opportunity to put our graduates in many of these companies, eventually developing technologies for them. We have a client-oriented process, from administration all the way to technological solutions, either in terms of training or research. And these links with companies are part of our daily work. We develop curriculum with them, create labs with and for them, and develop technologies with them. UNAQ initially focused on developing training for the different sub-sectors within the industry; now, we are developing technology and supporting both public entities and the government on developing public policies. We are part of public policies developments that we need to create together with different points of view for industry 4.0. We have the entire support of the industry itself; we are a global industry and need to comply with all the specific standards.